Make this Daddy Robot craft!

Time to tidy up that playroom, squirt

Make this Daddy Robot craft!

If you're always standing on building blocks, sliding on crayons and swerving toy cars, the Bluey episode 'Daddy Robot' will feel familiar!

Bluey and Bingo enlist the help of Bandit (aka Daddy Robot) to clean up their playroom – but when the robot starts to malfunction, the Heeler sisters learn that sometimes it's easier to do the job yourself.

 

Sadly, our own Daddy Robot won't be doing the housework for us, but this craft is great fun to make, and won't create too much mess! We've made it super easy for you too – just download the free printable Bluey robot sheet to get started, then scroll down to follow the steps.

You can also find this activity in brand new Bluey Magazine. Issue 1 is selling fast in all major supermarkets and newsagents. And look out for issue 2 from 29 September.


You will need

How to make Daddy Robot

Step 1

Paint the bottom half of the cereal box light blue and the top half dark blue, then cut out the eyes, ears and nose. Cut out the snout using the yellow card.

Step 2

Bluey Daddy Robot

Bluey Daddy Robot

Stick on the eyes, then glue the facial features onto the cereal box in this order – right eye, yellow snout, left eye, nose.

Step 3

Bluey Daddy Robot

Daddy Robot craft

Fold four strips of blue card back and forth for the hands and legs. Stick these onto the cereal box, then glue on the hands and feet.

Step 4

Daddy Robot craft

Stick on Daddy Robot's circuit board. Add a flap using blue card to make a door.

Step 5

Daddy Robot craft

Cut out a semi-circle of foil and glue this below the circuit board. Stick the on and off buttons on top of the foil.

Step 6

Time to power up Daddy Robot! Ask your child to have a think about some of the things he might say:

  • "Beep beep brrrr!"
  • "To serve my master is the highest honour!"
  • "Powering down..."
  • creativity icon

    Creativity

    physical icon

    Physical

    Learning guide

    As your child helps you with all the physical bits of this make – the cutting, folding, painting, and sticking – they'll be working on their fine motor skills, which they need as they learn to write. Talk about the different materials you're using too and how the textures are different, like the shiny, scrunchy foil and stiff cardboard. What sounds does Daddy Robot make, and what would happen if your child presses the on or off buttons?